Plymouth – Good Growth in the Coolest Place

I attended the Plymouth Growth Board on Monday. The highlight for me was a presentation by the Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) about the Productivity Plan for Devon and Somerset. As you know we submitted a response on behalf of Plymouth’s social enterprises. The LEP welcomed our submission and also suggested that whilst there is a need to boost productivity it cannot be at any cost. They seemed receptive to the idea we submitted about ‘good growth’. Positive news there but we need to keep bringing this up wherever, whenever we can. We need an alliance of social enterprises, Transition movements, ecological economists, Coops, Fair Trade organizations and more to keep making the case for the economy and society we want. Plymouth City Council’s response also referenced Social Enterprise City and inclusive growth.

The main focus of the meeting was on skills. How do we ensure we get the best, most skilled workforces to help us develop and grow our businesses and improve the economy of Plymouth? There was a  focus on Plymouth’s STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) strategy. The Plymouth Skills Analysis is being refreshed – make sure you contribute to this when the opportunity arrives. Tell us what skills and what workforce you need to succeed as a social enterprise. Also, it was apparent that continuing to develop pathways for people into work they want is crucial to increase social mobility and opportunity.

Professor Jerry Richards gave a good overview of the economic impact of Plymouth University – one of PSEN’s members and the first social enterprise university in the world. £300 million is spent by students in Plymouth each year and the university’s annual wage bill is £150 million. Thousands of jobs in the city are directly and indirectly reliant on the university. How the university stays competitive in the context of Brexit was also discussed. The danger is that Plymouth becomes a less attractive place to study and loses EU research cash. The need for cleverness, ingenuity and partnerships in response to this is obvious. The national government’s industrial strategy promises £4.7 billion for science, research and innovation. A great opportunity and we need to make sure Plymouth is in the mix for this.

You can contribute to the government’s industrial plan by clicking here. Social Enterprise UK is leading a national response which PSEN will contribute to on behalf of our members. Tell us what you think should be the priorities. Book onto the national events in early April run by SEUK on skills (Stoke) and on procurement (London).

Finally, I found out that Plymouth is one of the ‘Top 20 Coolest Places to Live’ according to the Times newspaper. Cool – but we already knew that right?

Gareth Hart is Chair of Plymouth Social Enterprise Networkand a Director of Iridescent Ideas CIC

One Response to Plymouth – Good Growth in the Coolest Place

  1. Roger Higman April 27, 2017 at 3:18 pm #

    Hi Michelle, Hi Gareth

    Since no one’s commented yet (and as I can’t attend the AGM), I’ll pitch in.

    As the chief executive of a charity in Totnes and a Director of a social enterprise, I’ve been dismayed by how hard it is in Devon to get the sorts of training that would be considered basic for the third sector in London. Have a look at the Directory of Social Change catalogue (https://www.dsc.org.uk/training/) or the NCVO – https://www.ncvo.org.uk/images/documents/training-events/training/NCVO-training-brochure.pdf or Level-headed (http://www.levelheaded.org/what-we-do/training/).

    I appreciate that there is a much smaller market in Devon, but I’m paying £200+/day, plus the train fare, plus possibly a hotel bill to send people on training courses that ought to be available in Devon.

    I hope this helps

    Roger

Leave a Reply

Spam protection by WP Captcha-Free